Remove a field from an existing database dictionary record

database tips

Reference: HP SM HELP SERVER

Applies to User Roles:

System Administrator

This procedure maps any unwanted fields in your system to NULLTABLE. HP Service Manager does not actually remove data or delete the corresponding columns from the RDBMS.

Important: HP recommends you leave any unwanted columns mapped to NULLTABLE rather than actually deleting them from the RDBMS to preserve any legacy data these columns may still contain and to provide you a means to remap the columns at a later date.

If you choose to remove the column from the RDBMS, Service Manager will recognize the change and update the database dictionary record to map the deleted column to NULLTABLE the next time you restart the server and query the RDBMS table that contained the deleted column.

To remove a field from an existing database dictionary record, add a table nulltable with alias n1, using the dbdict utility:

Log in to Service Manager as a System Administrator.
Click Tailoring > Database Dictionary.
In the File Name field, enter the required file name, and then click Search.
When the correct file is displayed, select the SQL Tables tab.
Add the following line:

Alias Name Type
n1 NULLTABLE sqlserver
6. Click OK. A message appears, stating that the record has been updated in the dbdict file.

7. Select the Fields tab and double-click the column to be moved to the Null Table. The field window opens.

8. In the SQL Table field, change the entry from m1 to n1.

9. Click OK to return to the dbdict record. The ‘SQL Table’ column value for the changed field is now ‘n1.’

10. Click OK to save the changes in the specified table. A message appears, stating that the record has been updated in the dbdict file.

When you select the table through the System Definition utility, you will see the change.

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